The Personalized 10k Running Plan

Today I’ll be talking about my running plan, AKA listening to people who actually know what they’re talking about to train for a 10k.  😀

Well, mostly listening.

When I first started out as a runner I followed Cool Running’s Couch to 5k Program.  It was great at first.  Lots of walking, a little running – how could that be bad?  Once I got up to running five minutes, eight minutes, oh God no 20 minutes at a time I gave up.

A few years later I started running again.  I would listen to my body and run when I wanted to, walk when I felt like I was going to throw up.  As you can imagine, that didn’t last very well either.

This time around I actually did some research to figure out what plan was best for me.  With my goal firmly in mind I began to scour the internet for the perfect running plan.  Did I find it?  Well, no.  Unless I wanted to shell out some cash for a running coach, I was going to have to tailor someone’s plan to my fitness levels.  I decided to combine two 10k plans together to create my perfect running plan.

***

Plan 1:  Jeff Galloway’s 10k Training Plan

I’ve heard really fantastic things about Jeff Galloway.  His approach to running is a run/walk method.  He suggests walking before you get tired, which I think is a really great way to go about running.  It’s very easy to get burned out of running as a beginner when you try to go too hard too fast.  It’s something I’ve experienced multiple times, unfortunately.  Incorporating walking before you need to walk is an effective way to maintain strength and energy throughout the entire run.

His 10k plan is 13 weeks with only three runs per week.  13 weeks is the longest training plan I’ve seen, but most seem to do four runs per week, so that accounts for the difference.  He also includes three days of strength training/cross training, with one rest day every week before the long run.  Jeff Galloway’s 10k plan is definitely one that will set runners up for success.

10k Training Schedule
Week Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
1 walk or XT run 20-25 min walk or XT run 20-25 min walk or XT off 2 miles
2 walk or XT run 20-25 min walk or XT run 20-25 min walk or XT off 2 miles
3 walk or XT run 25-30 min walk or XT run 25-30 min walk or XT off 3 miles
4 walk or XT run 25-30 min walk or XT run 25-30 min walk or XT off 4 miles
5 walk or XT run 30-35 min walk or XT run 30-35 min walk or XT off 4 miles or 5K
6 walk or XT run 30-35 min walk or XT run 30-35 min walk or XT off 5 miles
7 walk or XT run 30-45 min walk or XT run 30-45 min walk or XT off 5 miles or 5K
8 walk or XT run 30-45 min walk or XT run 30-45 min walk or XT off 6 miles
9 walk or XT run 30-45 min walk or XT run 30-45 min walk or XT off 6 miles or 5K
10 walk or XT run 30-45 min walk or XT run 30-45 min walk or XT off 7 miles
11 walk or XT run 30-45 min walk or XT run 30-45 min walk or XT off 3.5 miles
12 walk or XT run 30-45 min walk or XT run 30-45 min walk or XT off 4 miles or 5K
13 walk or XT run 30-45 min walk or XT run 30-45 min walk or XT off 10K Race

Plan 2:  Jenny Hadfield’s 10k Training Plan

Jenny Hadfield actually has several different 10k plans.  She has a 10k walk plan, multiple level 10k run walk plans, and a few 10k run plans for beginner – advanced levels.  I’ll be using the 10k run-walk, which is geared towards first time 10k runners and injury prevention.

Jenny Hadfield’s training plans have more structure than Jeff Galloway, which is something I’m interested in trying.  Her plan is 10 weeks long with three runs per week the first three weeks, moving to four runs on weeks four – nine.  Jenny Hadfield’s runs are all longer time-wise than Jeff Galloway’s 10k training plan, and she includes two days of strength training/cross training each week instead of three.

Jenny Hadfield 10k Run-Walk***

Jeff Galloway and Jenny Hadfield both have exceptional training plans, but they aren’t quite what I need.  I’ve taken the best of both plans and personalized them for myself.  Here’s my plan:

10k-training-plan For reference, I have a base of 4 miles with a 12 min/mile average long run speed (slow runner in the house).  You’ll likely see me updating the plan as I go.  The most important thing to do with any kind of exercise is listen to your body.  If this plan ends up being too intense (or not challenging enough) I’ll certainly be making tweaks.

Advertisements